Threats to the Bandicoot

 

Threats to Bandicoot Population

Bandicoots, one of the rarest creatures in the world are swiftly becoming extinct due to the loss of their environmental surroundings and failure to cope with other animals for food sources. The origination of livestock animals and rabbits, have significantly affected the bandicoot's habitat and food source. Earlier, attempts were made to catch and exterminate rabbits but it had a negative effect on the bandicoot population as well.

Different threats posed to this species

As the bandicoots usually execute the needful task of digging up the land and other young insects, pet dogs and cats pose a danger to their existence. Contaminating the land to liberate it from the lawn grubs is also a serious threat.



Alike other predators, foxes are one of the greatest menaces to the bandicoots. After their introduction in Australia, they have been accountable for hunting down many small species including the bandicoots. They fall easy prey to the foxes because they are probably the weakest marsupial.

Another big threat is the destruction of their natural habitat through clearing of forests, bushlands, thorny wild plants and grasslands, which has resulted in lack of proper shelter and food for the bandicoots.

Cats are one more menace to the population of the bandicoots. They smell the presence of bandicoots, attack their shelter and eat sleeping bandicoots. They even hunt them at the time when they come out from their nests in search of food. They also cause trouble among the bandicoot population by inflicting parasites, which they carry in their guts. A deadly disease called Toxoplasmosis carried by cats kill small animals like the bandicoots and even other marsupials.

Even dogs are drawn closer to the bandicoots with the smell from their grass-filled shelter and they end up either injuring them or killing these sleeping animals. The human are also not far away in destroying the bandicoot population. The fast moving cars are also somewhat responsible for their deaths. At night, when they are out of their shelters in search of food, they may have to explore a large territory where they even cross the roads and while doing so the fast approaching cars hit them.

Snail Pellets, which are quite poisonous, are accountable for killing bandicoots and other wildlife animals.



How can you help?

Call the Taskforce that gets rid of foxes at 1300 FOXOUT or you can even lend a hand in the fox control programs. You can take active responsibility in building the Bandicoot’s surrounding and provide them with a safe shelter. Choose some dense areas with thorny bushes and shrubs and plant grasses and small plants. When you are cleaning the land, make sure you keep an exit that would allow the bandicoots to move out of the way of your cleaning.

To gather any additional assistance and knowledge on how to maintain wildlife habitat, contact the Biodiversity Conservation Branch of DPIW.

Do not allow cats to move around during the daytime or at night. If possible, lock up your cat in an outdoor cathouse or keep it inside the house, just as you would do with your pet dog. You can even get your cat de-sexed to stop unnecessary reproduction of kittens and stray cats.

Make sure that no stray dogs or even your pet dog is roaming near the habitats of the bandicoots, such as near the bush lands, grasslands and near the hedges. If possible, secure that area from dogs and allow space to these little creatures to move out.


 

 
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